Archive for the ‘Import News’ Category

Russian Car Importers Hold Protest

April 17, 2008

Last Tuesday Russian Car Importers held a protest against changes made starting April 1st in Vladivostok, Far East Russia, which have caused huge delays getting imported vehicles cleared.

On April 1, two customs posts – Vladivostok Auto Transport and Vladivostok Central – were combined into one – Vladivostok Commercial Port – by officials intended to smooth the process. In reality, the reshuffle has caused much chaos, delays, and as a result, money lost. Because of the large backlog and daily storage fees of about $20 per a car, auto businessmen acquire considerable lost which are bringing in double and triple digit numbers of cars each day. Ships are even being delayed as they must wait a few days before they can offload their vehicles.

In protest, traders decorated their vehicles with orange ribbons and the slogan “Car Dealers against Bureaucracy” and marched in front the Far Eastern Customs Department. Importers are look for the government to step in, cut, and normalize the clearance time. April may be a sluggish month for Japanese used car exports to Russia. Businessmen are looking forward to getting back to schedule.

Driving On The Right Side… Of The Road Or Car?

April 11, 2008

As many of you may be aware, Japan is a RHD (Right Hand Drive) vehicle country like the UK. According to Wikipedia, about 34% of the world by population drive on the left, and 66% on the right. By roadway distances, about 28% drive on the left, and 72% on the right. To visualize this:

RHD vs. LHD on a World Map

Those in blue are RHD and those in red are LHD. The terms left or right hand drive refer to where the driver sits in the motor vehicle not where the car is on the road. So in the case of Japan, the steering wheel is on the right hand side.

Most markets that are already RHD will find much value in Japanese used vehicles. Areas such as South-East Asia, Oceania, Eastern Africa, and the British Isles are major importers. Because they use the same system as Japan, there are less hassles getting the vehicles imported. But just because a country doesn’t drive the same way as Japan doesn’t mean RHD vehicles can’t be imported.

For example, Russia is officially regulated for LHD traffic, but Japanese RHD cars are the single largest supplier of used cars to Russia. Last year over 440 thousand vehicles where exported from Japan into Russia. Russia is estimated to have more than 1.5 million RHD vehicles on its roads. In the far eastern regions, such as Vladivostok or Khabarovsk, RHD vehicles make up to 90% of the total. Many other LHD nations are also importing RHD in the thousands without any problems such as Canada, UAE, Chile, Mongolia, Cyprus, and Peru.

There are two considerations for importers. First, are RHD vehicles legally able to be imported, and more importantly, driven in your country. Even in the case that RHD autos cannot be used on your roads, many governments allow the vehicle to be modified so that it is switched to LHD.

The second consideration is if you are willing to drive “on the wrong side” or will you be able to sell cars to customers that are RHD. It is not a matter of being a safety hazard if the driver sits on the other side. A Canadian study showed that RHD drivers were more careful, thus less likely to get into accidents, than those who drove like normal.

It is also not about not getting able to feel comfortable driving RHD drive in a LHD nation. Most drivers who experience this challenge are able to overcome the awkwardness of driving differently within the first few hours on the road. The main issues are do you mind standing out a little bit and will it bring to much inconvenience to your lifestyle? For example, you’ll need a passenger to help you through drive-thru’s and at toll booths. If you don’t mind, and you can import, there are plenty of benefits.

Image and Statistics from Wikipedia under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.

Tianjin, China’s Automobile Imports Increase

April 9, 2008

Xinhuanet reported that, in January and February 2008, 25,400 automobiles have been imported through Tianjin Port, worth 890 million US dollars. China Customs statistics reveal that imports in these two months increased 1.2 times and 1.3 times, respectively, over the same period last year.

Tianjin Port’s automobile import growth is a result of the gradual implementation of the national automobile import policy. In recent years, the Chinese government has promulgated policies related to automobile imports, including import license registration, Administration of Automobile Brand Sales Implementing Procedures, Landed Duty Paid, automobile consumption tax adjustments and tariff adjustments. Along with these implemented policies, policies related to car imports are being implemented, car import policies are stabilizing, and the number of imported cars are growing; new automotive administration procedures will be implemented, according to the Tianjin Customs District.

Source: People’s Daily Online

Japanese Exporters may want to see what is happening over in your neighbor’s land. China has been increasing its consumption at huge rates and more Chinese will be looking for affordable cars soon.

State Worker’s Tax Discounts End In Sri Lanka

April 8, 2008

Sri Lanka has finished a scheme that gave tax-slashed cars to state workers from today and no new applications would be taken, the finance ministry said.

State workers who have been issued tax slashed import permits but have not opened letters of credit before the end of last month (March 31) would not be able to open letters of credit to import vehicles.

However the tax discounts would continue for buying a locally produced or assembled car.

State workers who have already applied and who qualify for the tax concession would be issued a permit to buy locally produced or assembled car, the finance ministry said in a statement.

Earlier reports said around 17,000 state-workers have applied to import tax-slashed cars.

Source-LBO.lk

Vietnamese Prime Minister Goes After Car Imports

April 7, 2008

The Prime Minister of Vietnam, Nguyen Tan Dung, asked the Vietnamese Ministries of Finance and Industry & Trade to use technical barriers and tariffs to restrict imports of automobiles and automobile components for less than 12-seat cars. Besides the raising of Import Tax done last month, both automobile and automobile components are now on the list of “import-restricted” items.

Attempting to reverse the ever growing trade deficit, the Prime Minister asked that imported goods be classified into three categories: essential, controlled, and restricted. All goods categorized in the controlled and restricted groups will face extra difficulties now.

These technical barriers and tariffs that will be applied include: the raising of import tax rates; limiting the access of importers to foreign currency loans; using technical barriers, etc. Japanese used car exporters should expect a slow down on cars exported to Vietnam when these blockades start coming into effect.

Importing Modified Cars

March 31, 2008

Japan is a great producer of performance road vehicles. Names such as Impreza, Skyline, RX-7/8, Soarer, among many others all come from the Japanese. Many of these many of these low and mid-level racing class vehicles have many aftermarket parts that improve performance or appeal. Can you import cars that have aftermarks parts?

Recently, there has been a lot of news of Mine’s and Amuse breaking track records with their aftermarket parts for the new GT-R. Other aftermarket companies, such as HKS, are also constantly developing new parts that increase power or improve aerodynamics or just lighten the vehicle. Some of these kits are only offered in Japan, while others maybe be found elsewhere. A question that often comes up is whether you can import cars that are upgraded.

Ultimately, you need to ask to your customs, environment, traffic, and/or road safety government agencies. You might be able to find some information about importing to your country at www.Japan-Used-Cars-Exporting.Info/Import/. For some countries, the laws on importing car a simple and may not be concerned about aftermarket parts. On the other side of the spectrum, some countries refuse entrance to any modified vehicle.

Another case includes that you can import modified vehicles, but they need to pass normal and maybe additional test. You country might have also an approval list of parts that are acceptable.

In general, importing a modified vehicle would cost possibly significantly more. If you are able to find the aftermarket parts sold in your country, you may find it easier to import a stock car then have additional modification installed after the car is legalized and import process is completed. You might (if your country allows) be able to import aftermarket kits and mod later as another option.

Sri Lanka Customs Revenue Takes Hit

March 20, 2008

Just last month, we reported how Sri Lanka raised import taxes by 10%. This month we are seeing the protest of importers have effect. Instead of raising revenue the government gets from imports, they actually get less.

In 2007, the Sri Lanka Customs made Rs.8 Billion less overall than expected. They expected Rs.283 Billion and only made Rs.275 Billion. While there was an overall increase, income from vehicle imports drop by Rs.11 Billion. They were expecting Rs.26 Billion from vehicle excise tax, but only got Rs.15 Billion.

There are a number of reasons for this. First, in 2006, nearly 70% of car imports were from Japan and this year it was only 46% that were mostly buses and vans. The other imports were coming from places such as China, India, and Korea. This other countries make and sell their cars cheaper, so as a result, that means less income for Sri Lanka.

The second reason for less revenue, is because many car imports are being imported by civil servants which get duty free import permits. As people know, Sri Lanka has among the highest duty rates so getting duty free permits really help imports and really reduce import revenue.

This is not the end of this. If import duties continue to stay high, they can continue to expect less revenue. One official says while the revenue target from motor vehicle imports for 2008 is estimated at Rs. 35 Billion, it will be difficult to make even 40% of that estimate. Hopefully, we can see a change of heart and a drop in the super high import taxing.

For more information on importing into Sri Lanka, visit:
Japanese Used Car Exporting.Info – Importing Help For Sri Lanka

Import Tax Upped In Vietnam

March 18, 2008

Vietnamese Government have decided to raise import taxes for both new and used car imports by 10%. The new rates come into effect at the beginning of April.

After a few years of lowering import taxes to keep vehicle prices down, this year marks yet another change in policy. The government claims they want to restrict the amount of cars being imported and bought to slow down the amount of traffic increases. Traffic jams are at all time intensities, and they feel reducing imports will fix this problem. The real problem is poor urban planning for the only two cities that have real traffic problems: Hanoi, the capitol in the north, and Ho Chi Minh in the south.

Another problem is arising for many importers, not just in Vietnam, but globally. Many countries, like Vietnam, trade in US Dollars. The problem is the value is sinking like a rock and importer who have to wait a month for their consignments to arrive are having a difficult time making profit. I don’t know how longer countries will continue to use the US Dollar, but trade can sure use a switch.

For some more information on import used cars to Vietnam, visit:
Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Import Help for Vietnam

Information Seminars On Importing Vehicles Into Canada

March 17, 2008

Canada Border Services Agency has begun holding free seminars in various cities throughout Canada about importing cars into Canada. These seminars are very helpful and informative to anyone thinking about purchasing a vehicle in another country and importing it into Canada.Typically these seminars will have 5-8 guest speakers from various government agencies, including Canada Border Services agency, Transport Canada, RIV, and the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.Topics covered include:

  • requirements
  • documentation
  • prohibitions
  • costs
  • regulations of the Canada Border Services Agency, Transport Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the provincial government

Attendees will be given helpful literature and example paperwork related to importing vehicles into Canada. There is also time given to address specific questions or concerns that you may have about the importation process.

For dates and times of the seminars, or to register for a seminar in your area visit the Information Sessions and Seminars section on the Canadian Border Services agency website.

Source: ImportCartoCanada.info

If you don’t feel like going to a seminar or waiting, you can get much info on importing from Japan into Canada used cars at:

Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Importing Help For Canada

Uganda Imports Hit By Kenya Rift

March 11, 2008

In January, the Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) collected Ush10.75 billion from car imports (new & used) compared to the average monthly revenue of Ush11.49 billion. Kenya is to blame as transport from the Mombasa seaport is restricted from civil unrest.

Uganda, not being on the coast, must import vehicles through either Kenya (Mombasa) or Tanzania (Dar-es Salaam). Importers prefer to go through Mombasa, which is considerably cheaper after road or rail transport into Uganda is added.

Importers also argue this isn’t the only thing affecting their sales, but also the high taxes imposed. Car imports is one of the largest sources of revenue for the Uganda government.

Luckily for importers, tensions in Kenya are starting to loosen, allowing trade to return to previous levels. Japanese exporters can sigh relief that this dip in trade is only temporary.

Import News For Philippines

March 10, 2008

Apparently, the Filipino Government has finally become active against illegal imports of used cars “smuggled” into their country. Laws which have banned the importation of used cars (heavily lobbied for by new car importers) have been around for a while, but before the government never really actively enforced these laws. Recently there has been changes as Customs have started seizing many cars throughout the Islands.

This is unfortunate news to Japanese exporters as last year over 11,400 vehicles were exported for the Philippines. Many Filipino importers have now canceled orders as their government have started to use X-ray machines on containers. For now, trade will have to wait till everything is sorted out.

More Caribbean News

March 6, 2008

Dominican Republic, a Spanish speaking nation, have put a 5 year age limit on cars imported. Any car imported that is over 5 years old from date of manufacturing will face a hefty fine determined by the Republic’s Customs.

Dominica, a English speaking nation also in the Caribbeans, have put a 4 year age limit on cars imported. Any car imported that is over 4 years old from date of manufacturing will face an additional 140% excise tax.

Join Our Newsletter

March 3, 2008

I want to invite our visitors to join our newsletter hosted by our sister site. It is an excellent way to stay in touch with what is happening in the Japanese used car exporting/importing world. You can join by simply visit:

JCarsNow.com – Newsletter

Import Taxes Up in Sri Lanka

February 29, 2008

In a strange attempt to cut the trade deficit, the Sri Lanka government passed a new tax that equals out to 10% more over the already insane taxes equaling out to between 250 to 350 percent.

Sri Lanka has consistently have problems dealing with their trade balance as each year they import more than they export. To deal with the problem, they try to cut the amount of imports of the biggest category: cars. The problems with doing this include sky-rocketing prices for used cars. This is because Sri Lanka doesn’t produce any used cars, and if the government kinks the imports (by raising costs), demand go up and supply plummets.

Of course, the average person in Sri Lanka cannot afford a used (4-years old) Corolla that costs over $40,000. So what happens? The government indeed cuts off trade, but at the expense of it’s people. More sad days ahead for would-be consumers.

Trinidad and Tobago Introduces Import Licenses

February 26, 2008

In an effort to manage vehicle imports (particularly from Japan) more effectively, the Trinidad and Tobago Government has started issuing Importing Licenses from the beginning of the year.

It is not clear whether only dealers can apply for and receive such licenses or if it is available for anyone. But the effects can already be felt. Because of this transition of requiring a licenses was started this year, many importers lost thousands of dollars after not having the proper documents to import the vehicle. If a car importer doesn’t not have a licenses from now on, they will not be able to clear the car.

So far over 350 foreign used car dealers have this license.

New Year for Russia, New Rules for Importers

February 19, 2008

Latest news from Russia is starting this year, individual importers will be limited 1 car. Now what does that mean?

Very simple. People can’t import more than 1 whole car as a personal import. Importer businesses can continue on no problem, and for the individuals, you’ll have to resort to (but not recommended) importing parts which basically means cars split in half.

So at the moment, importing should see much of a big hit, but if other rules change, things can tighten. And for those not watching the news, Russia will be getting a new president this year so things might change a little.

Back from Holidays – News on Bulgaria and Kenya

February 18, 2008

Hi readers, I just got back on the weekend from holiday/vacation last week. Reading my mail and RSS feeds seems that there hasn’t been too much going on while I was gone.

There are claims that Kenya might be hit in its imports due to the [big] political changes happening, resulting in possible tighter controls. On the other hand, Bulgaria’s used car import figures have increased, but in my opinion, that looks like a short term jump. The demographics just won’t be able to sustain to much imports. (Bulgaria has a small rich class, and the rest are of a quite poor class)

Other than that, check back later this week for more info coming up. And as always, if you got questions on importing, check out:

The Website – Japan-Used-Car-Exporting.info/Import/ -and-
The Forum – JCarsNow.com/JDM/

Australian Import Duty Going Down in 2010?

February 5, 2008

A little tidbit of information I’ve found. I don’t know if it will go through or not, but according to the 2007 Australian Customs Tariff Schedule, we may see the Duty rate drop from 10% to 5% in 2010. Here is what it says:

Tarrif Numbers 8703.21, 8703.22, 8703.23, 8703.24, 8703.31, 8703.32, 8703.33, 8703.90
—-Used or secondhand vehicles

10%, and $12 000 each [that is $12,000 if you fail to get import approval before arrival]

From 1 January 2010:
5%, and $12 000 each [same as above]

Source (PDF)

If that is true, that will make importing even cheaper for Australian looking to import JDM. Hopefully it gets through.

For more information on Importing to Australia, and other countries, visit:

http://japan-used-car-exporting.info/import/

Interact on Japanese Import Forum

January 30, 2008

Hi all readers,

If you need some help on importing Japanese used cars, you should check our sister location:

www.JCarsNow.com/jdm/

It a great place for you to ask questions on many topics:

Buying from Japanese auto auctions or from dealer’s/exporter’s stocks, exporting, shipping, importing, customs, and of course, the cars themselves. Share your importing experiences and suggestions with others. You should find me online there everyday if you need help. Because it is a forum, rather than a blog, you should be able to interact a lot more over there. Enjoy!

Import The NEW Nissan GT-R to Australia!

January 23, 2008

According to Prestige Motorsport, the new R35 GT-R can now be imported legally under SEVS!However, compliance is as far as 12 months away (2009), and prices are expected to exceed AU$100,000 for the new Nissan supercar. Regardless, this is a big fist in the eye of Nissan Australia, as enthusiasts will now be able to grab the new car directly from the JDM without Nissan Australia’s interference!

[Source: ImportJap.com]

For more information:
SEVS Entry No. 477/00
Australian Importing Help

Changes in Import Markets

January 15, 2008

Russia has seen a recent rise in the number of disassembled cars imported. The used cars are disassembled in Japan and imported as parts, rather than whole vehicles, to benefit from lower tariff rates. This is because Russian Customs office considerable raise the duties for whole car verses car parts. Once it is imported to Russia, a car is reassembled for on road use as a used motor vehicle. Because this has increased dramatically in the recent year (a knock-on effect of the revived/reviving economy), it is said Russia will be taking steps to discourage this “loop-hole” in the rules.

Peruvian importers have had a new regulation for importing used vehicles since the 15th of November, 2007 that put restriction on importing vehicles by allowing used vehicles less than or equal to 80,000km only. Not too bad for them. Many Japanese used cars sold at auctions can run below that limit and still be cheap.

It appears the New Zealand government will indeed put the stricter emission controls scheme into effect starting from the 3rd of January, which is expected to reduce the number of new and old vehicles compared to the previous years. At the requests of importers, they’ve made the ramp-up to higher emission regulations longer than previously set. This may (most likely some say) have an affect on number of imports coming in. Time will tell how long before importers start buying smart.

After all the disappointing news, there is a bright side. Imports are as strong as ever world-wide and people still like JDM cars. Look at all the car that are allowed into countries around the globe. I would predict no loss of ground this coming year as emerging market open up and mature markets get smarter on importing. Of course, that is if they have the knowledge necessary for importing. Something that starts over at Japanese-Used-Car-Exporting.info AKA JUCE.info

Tighter Laws in Ireland for High-Emission Vehicles

December 7, 2007

Motor tax for cars with high emissions is to increase dramatically under new measures announced in a carbon budget by Minister for the Environment John Gormley.

Cars with the lowest emissions will be charged only €100, however, the cars in the top band will be obliged to fork out €2,000.

The measures for new cars will come into force from July.

More at http://www.rte.ie/news/2007/1206/budget.html

Additionally, VRT, or Vehicle Registration Tax, will be based also on Emission levels. Government’s proposed laws should, by linking the money in people’s pockets with emissions, reduce levels. According to the Government, car owners could benefit in reduced VRT rates if they choose greener cars.

More at http://www.rte.ie/news/features/budget2008/issues/airroadrail.html

New Zealand gets harder on Imports

November 27, 2007

Unless things change, our Kiwi friend might have a more difficult time in the future importing Japanese car. Here’s a clip from NZ that gives the crux of the issue.