Posts Tagged ‘Nissan’

Auction Watch: 2008 Nissan GT-R

December 10, 2008

Have you heard of the that little name before? Of course, it seems as if everybody knows about the GT-R (of the Skyline heritage). In fact, it seems to be the embodiment of Japanese sports cars in almost every aspect. This huge name is in popular demand in many parts of the world and you might be interested to know that it easy to get (although expensive) on the used car market.

Yep, that’s right. You can pop over to your favorite exporter/auction agent and find a number of “used” 2008 (and soon 2009) GT-Rs. We call them “used” because they’ve been purchased once by the person putting it on market, not because they’ve been driven a significant distance. One such example is a car on JCarBuys: a 2008 Nissan GT-R Black Edition with Bose sound system. Here’s some details:

Equipment: automatic air conditioning (climate control), anti-lock brakes, alloy wheels, power steering, power windows, spoiler, supplemental restraint system (air bags), cd player, television, navigation, central locking, electronic fuel injection, electric seats, leather seats, power mirrors, stereo, tiptronic, 3-seat
Vehicle notes: BRAND NEW CAR, FACTORY BOSE SOUND SYSTEM, REAR/REVERSE MONITOR, Black Edition.
R35 - 2008 Nissan GT-R Black Edition/Bose System - Black R35 - 2008 Nissan GT-R Black Edition/Bose System - Black R35 - 2008 Nissan GT-R Black Edition/Bose System - Black
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UK Waits Till March 2009 For Nissan GT-R

March 5, 2008

Just out, Nissan UK puts a price tag on the all-new GT-R that is coming to the Isles in March, 2009. Pre-orders start this April, but why wait?

The UK branch has decided to charge £52,900 for the base GT-R, £54,200 for the Premium Edition, and £55,500 for the Black Edition. In comparison, Japanese auto auctions are selling the Premium Edition for £43,000. You can import a GT-R yourself for not that much more and get the car one year earlier than everyone else.

With all the costs involved in importing (Duty, VAT, test, registration, etc.), you can pay a few thousand more (about £59,000) and skip the wait, getting your GT-R one year before others in the UK. If your able to afford a GT-R, you’re probably able to afford paying a few more quid if you want the GT-R. If you need more help on importing, visit this guide for importing into the UK.

Import The NEW Nissan GT-R to Australia!

January 23, 2008

According to Prestige Motorsport, the new R35 GT-R can now be imported legally under SEVS!However, compliance is as far as 12 months away (2009), and prices are expected to exceed AU$100,000 for the new Nissan supercar. Regardless, this is a big fist in the eye of Nissan Australia, as enthusiasts will now be able to grab the new car directly from the JDM without Nissan Australia’s interference!

[Source: ImportJap.com]

For more information:
SEVS Entry No. 477/00
Australian Importing Help

What’s special about Japanese cars? (PART A)

November 21, 2007

Why would somebody be interested in importing a car? What would be its benefit?

This part A of a series.

These are question common among people who live outside the JDM world. This because they aren’t familiar with it, just as they aren’t familiar with the acronym JDM (which means Japanese Domestic Market)

For a car to be JDM isn’t just merely any car from Toyota, Nissan, Honda, etc., but rather any car designed, built, and marketed with the Japanese society in mind. For example, the Toyota Allion or the Nissan Figaro. This are called exclusive JDM cars as they were JDM car and where sold only in Japan.

There is another type of JDM cars, as you might guess, that are designed, built, etc. for Japan, but were/are sold in other countries, often re-badged. For example the Toyota Hilux Surf is the same as 4Runner and Toyota Rush is also sold as a Daihatsu Be-go. Also look at the Subaru line-up. The line between a non-exclusive JDM car and merely a Japanese make car is thin and some people consider them the same.

So in-route to answer the first question, I would like to point out the source of their “specialness” is the JDM competitiveness. Most countries don’t manufacture vehicle and America, one of the biggest automotive industries in the world, only has the “Big Three”. In contrast, Japan has Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Suzuki, Subaru, and Daihatsu producing cars and Hino, Isuzu, and Mitsubishi Fuso which mostly focus on the larger transport industries.

Because of the more competitive nature of Japan, there is more choices of models and sub-models/types that are offered that aren’t sold elsewhere. Also there are more technological advancements being introduced all the time. Navigation system are standard nowadays and many cars have much more advance systems for safety, performance, economical, and ecological purposes.

To put it simple, one point for why JDM cars are special is that there is more variety and they are more technologically advance (even compared to comparable Japanese make cars outside of Japan).