Posts Tagged ‘vehicle’

Car Watch: Honda Integra Type R

November 20, 2008

Continuing our series all about the different types of vehicles you can find from Japanese used car exporters, this time we will focus on the Honda Integra Type R. Coming from one of the most popular manufactures for cars, the Integra Type R is of the sporty variety, popular about car enthusiasts and car tuners.

For those who are unfamiliar with a somewhat common terminology, not all Integras are Type R. Type R refers to the “Racing” type of a vehicles (same as Civic Type R), which involves the car’s weight being reduced by taking anything unnecessary out and also using more performance-orientated parts for vital systems. The other way to look at it is that a Type R car is generally more uncomfortable, noisier, and much less “options” that would otherwise weigh down the car. As an example, here is a 2000 Honda Integra Type R:

DC2 - 2000 Honda Integra Type R - red

When considering if there is a market for these types of vehicles in your country, you must also consider import rules concerning these cars. Often, they are using after market parts instead of the standard stock parts and because of that, they may not qualify to come into your country. On the other hand some countries don’t mind you import special vehicles as long as they pass safety and emission tests (such as Australia).

Even if you don’t particularly like these types of cars as an importer, maybe there is niche market where you are for these types of vehicles. Another benefit is the cars generally produce very passionate crowds that are willing to go extra lengths to purchase such a vehicle.

Related Pages:
Car Watch: Mercedes-Benz A-class
Car Watch: Toyota Landcruiser Prado

Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 7 – ORIX

August 8, 2008

Company: ORIX
General Website:
Locations: Kobe, Atsugi, Nagoya, Fukuoka
Auctions Held: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday

In continuation to our series on different auto auctions in Japan, I would like to present ORIX Rental Service Auctions. ORIX is a major rental company in Japan and Asia. Like most rental companies, cars must constantly be replaced with new, more attractive. So you might wonder where that car you rented a few years went? Well most like for ORIX cars, they were probably auctioned off to smart buyers.

One benefit of buying from a rental company’s auction is that you know all the cars are from the same owner. That means there is a roughly the same owner’s care to all the cars presented. Also, the cars would’ve been reguarly checked and serviced by their mechanics. As a rental company, they will want to recover as much value from the car as possible and most likely wouldn’t neglect the cars condition.

One thing to note is that this auction is “Nyuusatsu”. That means you just place a bid once instead of “battling” your way up. All offers are collected and the person with the highest bid wins. This is different from the typical, but it has some benefits. For example, the agent is not wasting time on the actual bidding process and can spend more time on other things like inspecting.

Buying from rental company auctions, such as ORIX’s, has many benefital aspects. Having your exporting agent able to check their auction would be useful, especially for cars and trucks you would expect in a rental fleet.

Related:
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 1 – USS
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 2 – JAA
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 3 – Zip
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 4 – AAAi / ARAI
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 5 – Bay Auc
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 6 – TAA

Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 6 – TAA

July 1, 2008

TAA Japanese Toyota Auto Auction Logo

Official Website: taaweb.jp
Established: 1967
Locations: Chubu, Fukushima (Tohoku), Hiroshima, Kanto, Kinki, Kyushyu, South Kyushyu (Kagoshima; Minami Kyushyu), Okinawa, Yokohama
Auctions Held: Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays

TAA (Toyota Auto Auction) is another type of auto auction found in Japan. This group of 9 auction house was created for Toyota dealers to sell any unwanted cars, such as older cars customers traded in while buying from the dealer. Not only are there such auctions available for Toyota dealers, but there is HAA (Honda), SAA (Suzuki), SUAA (Subaru), NAA/NTAA (Nissan), MAA (Mitsubishi), and IMA (Isuzu).

One advantage TAA has over most of it competing auto auctions is that they publish higher quality images of vehicles from the inspection. While most auto auctions have 300px by 225px photos of the cars, TAA saves photos at 640px by 480px. So in a real way TAA gives auction bidders a “clearer” picture of what condition the car is before the auction begins.

More information is available on the Japanese website: TAA Web (Japanese)

Related:
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 1 – USS
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 2 – JAA
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 3 – Zip
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 4 – AAAi / ARAI
Japanese Auto Auction Series Part 5 – Bay Auc

Bangladesh Investigates New “Used” Imports

June 24, 2008

The National Board of Revenue (NBR) of Bangladesh is looking into the possiblity of people importing brand new cars as “reconditioned” cars, mostly from Japan.

As many Japanese used car exporters are aware, brand new vehicles are quickly registered and de-registered to circumevent Japanese laws forbidding anyone besides the manufacturer from exporting new vehicles. Technically, in the eyes of the law these are no longer brand new vehicles, just new or “as-new” vehicles. Why this matter to Bangladesh NBR is that they make 50% higher import duty on cars imported as new.

To counter this, it is proposed for the new budget that for a vehicle to be considered a “reconditioned” car, it must have a space 365 days between registration and deregistration and have clocked at least 1,000 km of mileage. They hope this will close the loop hole.

It’s not all bad news for importers though. Also in the proposed budget, the government will reduce supplementary duties from 60 percent to 20 percent on import of ordinary non-luxurious microbuses with and engine size between 1500 to 1800 CC which are used for transportation of industrial raw materials and/or passengers.

Source – The New Nation

New VRT Rates Start 1 July 2008 for Ireland

June 20, 2008

From 1 July 2008 in Ireland, Category “A” cars will be taxed based on the level of CO2 emissions and not engine size as before. Also, the 50% discount of VRT payable for hybrid electric and flexible fuel vehicles is replaced by VRT relief of up to €2,500 depending on the car’s age (for hybrids only). This will only apply to car registered after 30 June, while cars imported before will continue under the old system.

According to The Irish Revenue Commissioner’s Leaflet:

New Tax Regime

From 1 July 2008, VRT payable on category A vehicles will no longer be based on the engine size but rather on the level of CO2 emissions from the car. Linking the VRT rates to the level CO2 emissions will mean that individuals purchasing cleaner, low emission cars will pay less VRT while those opting to purchase higher emitting vehicles will pay more.

A seven-band CO2 emission system will apply. VRT will now be charged as a percentage of the OMSP (Open Market Selling Price) in accordance with the following table:

CO2 Emissions (CO2g/km) VRT Rates
0 – 120g 14% of OMSP
More than 120g/km up to and including140g/km 16% of OMSP
More than 140g/km up to and including 155g/km 20% of OMSP
More than 155g/km up to and including 170g/km 24% of OMSP
More than 170g/km up to and including 190g/km 28% of OMSP
More than 190g/km up to and including 225g/km 32% of OMSP
More than 225g/km 36% of OMSP

Importers of Japanese used cars must have the CO2 Emissions levels declared on their Export or Deregistration Certificate, or have a printout emissions certificate for your particular model from the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport. If you don’t have proof, you will be charged the highest rate (36%) regardless of how efficient the car is.

Also, as an incentive to by eco-friendly cars, you can get reductions based the car age for hybrids. That is, the younger the car is, more money is deducted. Of course there is a minimum amount that still must be paid, but here are the discount rates:

Hybrid, flexible fuel and electric vehicles

The current relief of 50% reduction of the VRT payable on Hybrid and Flexi Fuel vehicles is withdrawn from 30 June 2008.

A VRT remission up to a maximum of €2,500 will be available on such cars registered between 1 July 2008 and 31 December 2010.

This relief is limited, on a sliding scale, depending on the age of the vehicle. The scale is as follows:

Age of vehicle Maximum amount which may
be remitted or repaid
New vehicle, first registration €2,500
Not a new vehicle but less than 2 years €2,250
2 years or over but less than 3 years €2,000
3 years or over but less than 4 years €1,750
4 years or over but less than 5 years €1,500
5 years or over but less than 6 years €1,250
6 years or over but less than 7 years €1,000
7 years or over but less than 8 years €750
8 years or over but less than 9 years €500
9 years or over but less than 10 years €250
10 years or over Nil

With effect from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2010, series production electric vehicles and electric motorcycles are exempt from VRT.

Note: There is no change for Category B (crew cabs, etc.), Category C (commercial vehicles) or Category M (motorcycles – other than electric motorcycles).

-Source: Change to the Tax Base

Importing Japanese Car Info Video

June 19, 2008

A little video for your enjoyment with a little reminder of where to go for information on importing Japanese used cars from Japan.

Top Importing Countries in Feburary 08

April 2, 2008
  1. Russia = 40,690
  2. Chile = 10,055
  3. UAE = 7,363
  4. New Zealand = 7,227
  5. Malaysia = 2,564
  6. South Africa = 2,139
  7. Mongolia = 1,759
  8. UK = 1,703
  9. Singapore = 1,646
  10. Cyprus = 1,612

Mongolia has been recently got more hungry for cars. New Zealand is feeling the restriction. Russia remaining as strong as ever. Chile has recently seen a rise of imports being the gateway to South America. Another hubs, Singapore and the United Arab Emirates are keeping steady, if not growing slightly.

Importing Modified Cars

March 31, 2008

Japan is a great producer of performance road vehicles. Names such as Impreza, Skyline, RX-7/8, Soarer, among many others all come from the Japanese. Many of these many of these low and mid-level racing class vehicles have many aftermarket parts that improve performance or appeal. Can you import cars that have aftermarks parts?

Recently, there has been a lot of news of Mine’s and Amuse breaking track records with their aftermarket parts for the new GT-R. Other aftermarket companies, such as HKS, are also constantly developing new parts that increase power or improve aerodynamics or just lighten the vehicle. Some of these kits are only offered in Japan, while others maybe be found elsewhere. A question that often comes up is whether you can import cars that are upgraded.

Ultimately, you need to ask to your customs, environment, traffic, and/or road safety government agencies. You might be able to find some information about importing to your country at www.Japan-Used-Cars-Exporting.Info/Import/. For some countries, the laws on importing car a simple and may not be concerned about aftermarket parts. On the other side of the spectrum, some countries refuse entrance to any modified vehicle.

Another case includes that you can import modified vehicles, but they need to pass normal and maybe additional test. You country might have also an approval list of parts that are acceptable.

In general, importing a modified vehicle would cost possibly significantly more. If you are able to find the aftermarket parts sold in your country, you may find it easier to import a stock car then have additional modification installed after the car is legalized and import process is completed. You might (if your country allows) be able to import aftermarket kits and mod later as another option.

Exporting to Mongolia

March 26, 2008

Information on exporting and importing Japanese used vehicles into Mongolia is very hard to come by, especially in English. This is difficult for importers and exporters alike as the try to find ways to bring trade to this rising star. Just last year in 2007, Mongolia was place as the 11th top importing country of Japanese used passenger vehicles.

The ever need of vehicles growing in Mongolia will be dramatically rising as the baby boom generation are starting become adults. In fact, according to US International Census data, the largest 5-year span group in Mongolia is 15-19 at about 300 thousands boys and girls.

Soon, these teenagers and young adults will be looking for affordable cars. For them, it is a choice between used Chinese, Korean, or Japanese cars. Currently, the market is very open and growing rapidly and is good time for Japanese used vehicle exporters to enter the market. For more information on importing used cars from Japan into Mongolia, visit:

Japanese Used Car Exporting Info – Importing Help For Mongolia

Japan Used Car Auctions: Not Only Japanese

March 21, 2008

When you think of Japanese used car auctions, you immediately think: Toyota, Nissan, Honda, Suzuki, Subaru, etc. But Japanese make cars aren’t the only cars you can get in Japan. Did you know that there are thousands of non-Japanese used cars going through auction in Japan everyday?

Seriously, the big auctions have sold today (this Friday): 1,012 Mercedes-Benz, 777 BMW, 412 VW, even 166 Mini. Over 230 Chrysler, 113 GM, 230 Volvo, 182 Fords, 106 Chevrolet, and hundreds of other foreign made cars.

If you are in a country that doesn’t have direct access to a particular brand, you could buy it at a Japanese auto auction and have the vehicle imported from Japan. For more information on exporting and importing used cars from Japan, you can visit JUCE.info.

Another reason to buy non-Japanese used cars in Japan is because you will be able to get a cheaper car than importing from another country while the condition of the vehicle has been kept very well. For example, there is a classic that you can buy in your country, but it will cost you a ton of money. You might be able to find the same car for a cheaper price and better maintained in Japan. Many exporters will allow you to use their access to search auto auctions for free if you register with them.

Just to point out, there are many auctions that auction foreign cars in Japan. There are also some Auctions that specialize specialize in Import Vehicles (into Japan) that have many foreign vehicle. One example is Zip Toyko and Osaka. For more information on other auto auctions, visit this Auto Auction In Japan List.

Import Tax Upped In Vietnam

March 18, 2008

Vietnamese Government have decided to raise import taxes for both new and used car imports by 10%. The new rates come into effect at the beginning of April.

After a few years of lowering import taxes to keep vehicle prices down, this year marks yet another change in policy. The government claims they want to restrict the amount of cars being imported and bought to slow down the amount of traffic increases. Traffic jams are at all time intensities, and they feel reducing imports will fix this problem. The real problem is poor urban planning for the only two cities that have real traffic problems: Hanoi, the capitol in the north, and Ho Chi Minh in the south.

Another problem is arising for many importers, not just in Vietnam, but globally. Many countries, like Vietnam, trade in US Dollars. The problem is the value is sinking like a rock and importer who have to wait a month for their consignments to arrive are having a difficult time making profit. I don’t know how longer countries will continue to use the US Dollar, but trade can sure use a switch.

For some more information on import used cars to Vietnam, visit:
Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Import Help for Vietnam

Information Seminars On Importing Vehicles Into Canada

March 17, 2008

Canada Border Services Agency has begun holding free seminars in various cities throughout Canada about importing cars into Canada. These seminars are very helpful and informative to anyone thinking about purchasing a vehicle in another country and importing it into Canada.Typically these seminars will have 5-8 guest speakers from various government agencies, including Canada Border Services agency, Transport Canada, RIV, and the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.Topics covered include:

  • requirements
  • documentation
  • prohibitions
  • costs
  • regulations of the Canada Border Services Agency, Transport Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the provincial government

Attendees will be given helpful literature and example paperwork related to importing vehicles into Canada. There is also time given to address specific questions or concerns that you may have about the importation process.

For dates and times of the seminars, or to register for a seminar in your area visit the Information Sessions and Seminars section on the Canadian Border Services agency website.

Source: ImportCartoCanada.info

If you don’t feel like going to a seminar or waiting, you can get much info on importing from Japan into Canada used cars at:

Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Importing Help For Canada

Uganda Imports Hit By Kenya Rift

March 11, 2008

In January, the Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) collected Ush10.75 billion from car imports (new & used) compared to the average monthly revenue of Ush11.49 billion. Kenya is to blame as transport from the Mombasa seaport is restricted from civil unrest.

Uganda, not being on the coast, must import vehicles through either Kenya (Mombasa) or Tanzania (Dar-es Salaam). Importers prefer to go through Mombasa, which is considerably cheaper after road or rail transport into Uganda is added.

Importers also argue this isn’t the only thing affecting their sales, but also the high taxes imposed. Car imports is one of the largest sources of revenue for the Uganda government.

Luckily for importers, tensions in Kenya are starting to loosen, allowing trade to return to previous levels. Japanese exporters can sigh relief that this dip in trade is only temporary.

Import Taxes Up in Sri Lanka

February 29, 2008

In a strange attempt to cut the trade deficit, the Sri Lanka government passed a new tax that equals out to 10% more over the already insane taxes equaling out to between 250 to 350 percent.

Sri Lanka has consistently have problems dealing with their trade balance as each year they import more than they export. To deal with the problem, they try to cut the amount of imports of the biggest category: cars. The problems with doing this include sky-rocketing prices for used cars. This is because Sri Lanka doesn’t produce any used cars, and if the government kinks the imports (by raising costs), demand go up and supply plummets.

Of course, the average person in Sri Lanka cannot afford a used (4-years old) Corolla that costs over $40,000. So what happens? The government indeed cuts off trade, but at the expense of it’s people. More sad days ahead for would-be consumers.

Buying From Auctions: Inspection Sheets

February 25, 2008

Auctions are an excellent place to start your search for a Japanese used car from Japan. This is because it has many benefits over other choices. The most obvious is the selection. On average there is about 20,000 vehicle listed every day, for that day alone, on the top 20 auction group listings. Another benefit is the value where, because there is so many cars to choose from, you’re not stuck with one costly vehicle to choose from because everyone want it. Another big benefit is the Inspection Sheets most auctions have.

Inspection Sheets were designed to give you, the bidder and buyer, a quick idea what kind of condition the car is in. Each auction does things a little from others, but in general they have the same content.

The first thing you might notice is a big car diagram usually found on the bottom right of most inspection sheets. This diagram show you the physical flaws on the body and glass on the car. The different symbols/letters mean different things to different auctions, but for some general information, look here for some general guidelines for auction grading.

On the top, you will often find especially on paper-based inspection sheets to larger box on the top left, and top right. On the left side this is usually the Exhibit number, the number give for that car so people can identify it on auction day. If you find a car you like, this is the number you should write down. Your auction agent (also called bidding agent) will be able to quickly find the vehicle to do a hands on inspection.

The box on the top right is car’s grading box. It will usually show a number, dash (not rated or worst condition), asterisks (***), or a letter. A zero or non-number usually signifies it’s been in an accident and/or repaired. An exception is R1 which means it has been modified for racing. Of course, as said earlier, there is a slight variation between auctions. With the numbers, the higher the better. In general, 3.5 is average/decent quality. That means it doesn’t have much more than a few minor scratches or very small dents. For exporting, this is probably the lowest standard you’ll want to avoid additional repairs.

Just a few more exception to the grading system. First the letter “S” means brand new and “T” mean special purpose vehicle. Also, if there is a smaller box below this grading box and has a letter or number, that box is for when they separately rate the interior of the car. Without the smaller grade box, the grading box is for both exterior and interior.

Other information you will find in an inspection sheet include:

  • Car identity numbers and information
  • Engine information
  • Transmission type
  • History
  • Last Car Inspection (Shaken)
  • Mileage
  • Color (Exterior and Interior)
  • Equipment
  • Fuel Type
  • Dimensions
  • Other sales points
  • and Inspection Notes

Most is self explanatory. One important thing to note is that all the grading is for the body’s condition and not include the rating for the car’s mechanical condition. To find how the car is mechanically, this information can be found in the “Inspection/Inspectors Notes” section. This is written in Japanese so will need to have it translated by your auction agent.

Auction Inspection Sheets are excellent tools for searching for cars, but they are not a substitute for hands on inspections of your agent that will be there at the auction physically. Make sure you mention to your agent exactly what you want and what is acceptable before he bids for you. Often, auction sites provide digital images for your agent to send you before bidding happens. Take your time, there are often many cars available that match your specification.

For more information on Inspection Sheets visit:

Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Inspection Sheets
Japanese Used Car Exporting.info – Japanese to English Inspection Sheet Translations

Interact on Japanese Import Forum

January 30, 2008

Hi all readers,

If you need some help on importing Japanese used cars, you should check our sister location:

www.JCarsNow.com/jdm/

It a great place for you to ask questions on many topics:

Buying from Japanese auto auctions or from dealer’s/exporter’s stocks, exporting, shipping, importing, customs, and of course, the cars themselves. Share your importing experiences and suggestions with others. You should find me online there everyday if you need help. Because it is a forum, rather than a blog, you should be able to interact a lot more over there. Enjoy!

Import The NEW Nissan GT-R to Australia!

January 23, 2008

According to Prestige Motorsport, the new R35 GT-R can now be imported legally under SEVS!However, compliance is as far as 12 months away (2009), and prices are expected to exceed AU$100,000 for the new Nissan supercar. Regardless, this is a big fist in the eye of Nissan Australia, as enthusiasts will now be able to grab the new car directly from the JDM without Nissan Australia’s interference!

[Source: ImportJap.com]

For more information:
SEVS Entry No. 477/00
Australian Importing Help

Japanese Car Age: How much does it matter?

January 22, 2008

When we are dealing with exporting/importing Japanese cars as individuals or as import businesses, we generally are speaking about Japanese used cars. This means there was a previous owner, whereas a new car would be one that never was previously owned. Note the distinction: a used car is one that is previously owned, not necessarily a old car. In fact within days of being out on the market, the new 2008 Nissan GT-R was sold as “used” at AUCNET last December.

So since age isn’t connected to the term “used”, what and how much does it matter when buying for export?

Well, most importantly, it matters to the ultimate customer which is either you or the people you will sell to. Some people just don’t want an “old” car in which they use the term very loosely, then there are also people very particular the age of the car for various reasons. For example, one model year could have major reworking of styling or performance compared to the last model year. Additionally, whole model generations can change the car you get.

What is good about Japanese Auto Auctions (Part 1 & 2 so far) is that they provide such an enormous supply of cars (and pictures!) that is changing every week and eventually the car that you want will be available. Of course, if you are extremely picky on the exact car, options, year, sub-model, etcetera, the longest I heard of was a few months wait.

Another reason buyers are concerned about the age of the car is the fact car do degrade over time in performance and condition. It is safe to say the average Japanese car is kept in good condition. The shaken (Japanese Bi-annual car inspection test) is very strict and it encourages owners to keep their car in good shape. Also, during winter in Japan, roads are not salted like many other countries tend to do. Thus a Japanese vehicle will experience much less corrosion and rust than a Western vehicle. In general, age does affect the car’s quality per say, but on average, much lesser of extent than elsewhere.

One final thought of concern is your governments regulations. Some countries regulate the vehicle’s age directly, some indirectly. For example of regulating by age:

  • The United States allow 25 years or older to import very easily. Newer vehicle must pass a number of standards, and car less than 6 years old become even more difficult to import.
  • In Canada, cars older than 15 years can be imported without restrictions. Newer vehicles must already meet Canadian Safety Standards at the time of manufacturing.
  • Australia allow imports free to enter if produced before 1 January, 1989. If newer, rules are tighter and vehicles must be complied to ADR (Australian Design Rules) by a Registered Automotive Workshop (RAW).
  • New Zealand has similar rules which allow cars built be 1990 to enter will little restrictions. New Zealand allow any car import for any age, as long as the meet requirements.
  • In the UK, any car at least 10 years old can be imported by just passing the MOT. A car less than that age must also pass the ESVA.
  • Cyprus requires special approval for cars older than 5 years since production.
  • In Pakistan, only vehicle less than 4 years old can be imported.
  • Bangladesh does not allow vehicle more than 4 years old to be imported.
  • In India, imported cars must be under 3 years old.
  • Nearby, Sri Lanka forbids import over 2 years old.
  • Peru doesn’t allow vehicle more than 5 years of age to be imported.
  • In Jamaica, imports are restricted cars 3 years or less, vans/light trucks 4 years or less, and returning residents may import vehicles5 years or less.

The age of the vehicle needs to fit all three needs (taste, condition, and regulations) for an enjoyable time importing Japanese used cars. For more information:

JUCE.info

Tighter Laws in Ireland for High-Emission Vehicles

December 7, 2007

Motor tax for cars with high emissions is to increase dramatically under new measures announced in a carbon budget by Minister for the Environment John Gormley.

Cars with the lowest emissions will be charged only €100, however, the cars in the top band will be obliged to fork out €2,000.

The measures for new cars will come into force from July.

More at http://www.rte.ie/news/2007/1206/budget.html

Additionally, VRT, or Vehicle Registration Tax, will be based also on Emission levels. Government’s proposed laws should, by linking the money in people’s pockets with emissions, reduce levels. According to the Government, car owners could benefit in reduced VRT rates if they choose greener cars.

More at http://www.rte.ie/news/features/budget2008/issues/airroadrail.html